Long Point Waterfowl A Leading Researcher: Ontario Organization Studies Waterfowl Issues

Based in Long Point, Ontario, Long Point Waterfowl is a non-profit, non-government organization dedicated to waterfowl and wetland-related research, conservation and training. Long Point Waterfowl also promotes Canada’s outdoor heritage.

Long Point Waterfowl was originally formed as Long Point Waterfowl and Wetlands Research Fund in the 1980s. Conservation-minded hunters at Bluff’s Club, a private hunting club on Long Point, were behind the efforts. Funding is still mainly from the Bluff’s Club members, but is also supported by Ducks Unlimited Canada, Waterfowl Research Foundation, Syndenham Conservation Foundation and the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

The headquarters for Long Point Waterfowl is at Bird Studies Canada in Long Point, which is also the administrator.

The primary purpose of Long Point Waterfowl is to study the staging ecology and requirements of waterfowl on the lower Great Lakes. Long Point Waterfowl scientists also monitor trends in the distribution and abundance of waterfowl, research waterfowl habitat and provide information regarding waterfowl management.

Research results are published in scientific journals and presented at leading symposiums.

Long Point Waterfowl Research Centre

A former Ontario Youth Ranger Camp, Long Point Waterfowl leased this facility near Turkey Point as a place to host students and hold youth programs.

Youth Involvement In Conservation

One of the more unique events at Long Point Waterfowl is its young biologists workshop. This annual summer event is aimed at teenagers who are thinking of a future career as a biologist, conservation officers, wildlife technician or other related fields.

Participants learn about banding ducks, habitat, wildlife ecology, the role of hunting in conservation and a wide variety of other topics. The multi-day event includes meals and a stay at the Long Point Waterfowl Research Centre. Participants also learn about the educational requirements of future careers and hear from professionals in those fields.

Long Point Waterfowl also hosts a multi-day event where teenagers can stay at the centre and take all the training for their hunting certification.

Fund executive director Scott Petrie is also a teacher at the University of Western Ontario and sees that the students coming in don’t have the same background in the outdoors.

“Within our profession, people aren’t getting the training,” he said. “When I get a 22-year-old, they’re behind the eight-ball because they don’t have the passion.”

Research Projects at Long Point

Tundra swans are regular visitors to Long Point on their migration route from wintering grounds on the Atlantic seaboard to the high Arctic breeding grounds. Since little was known about these long-distant migrants, one of the first projects Petrie undertook was a satellite tracking study to learn more about tundra swan migration routes.

This was groundbreaking research, as such a study had never been undertaken with tundra swans in North America.

Resulting research has shown much about the swans, how much time they spent on migration, feeding habits along the way, when they arrive in the Arctic and much more. A map of the migration is available on Long Point Waterfowl’s web site

When a problem began to appear that numbers of lesser and greater scaup were declining relative to the health of other waterfowl species, Long Point Waterfowl again turned to satellite transmitters to learn more about the birds. This effort is still ongoing and is part of a cooperative venture between several research organizations investigating the problem.

Another major research initiative looked at the historical abundance and distribution of phragmites at Long Point. This tall grass with feather-like tops, an invasive species, was rapidly expanding at Long Point and displacing native vegetation. Research showed it is less preferable as waterfowl habitat than native vegetation. Other researchers have since identified it is a problem at other locations in Southwestern Ontario.

A current study is looking at the expanding population of Greater Sandhill Cranes in Ontario and the impact on agriculture.

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